How to organize a get together

First of all, what on earth is a "get together"? Well, it's exactly what it sounds like, an event where people get together, meet, have fun and be merry, etc. etc. A get together is usually smaller than a party, or at least that's how it starts, with the idea of having a small group of friends or colleagues meet for some food and drink. It is much more informal than a lunch or a dinner, and is a great way to make people that don't really know each other mingle, or to talk to someone who you don't know very well but would like to get to know better. Now, I'm an English teacher, not an event planner, so I won't be giving you any great food or decoration ideas, but I can give you some useful phrases on how to invite (and convince) people to come to your gathering. So, are you coming?

 

Making invitations


Most invitations for these informal gatherings are done in a conversation, you would usually bring it up during a meeting or a call. You might also send a text or similar if you don't regularly see the person. Here is an example dialogue between between two colleagues:


Ben: Hey, by the way [a way to introduce a new topic of conversation], we're having a little get together tomorrow night at Jerry's house. Do you want to come by [phrasal verb: casually visit]?

Tom: Uh, yeah maybe! Around what time?

Ben: People will probably show up [phrasal verb: arrive] around 18.

Tom: Okay, I might swing by [phrasal verb: arrive] after 19, I have a class at the gym until 18:30. Is that cool [informal for, "is that okay"]?

Ben: Of course, we'll probably be hanging out [phrasal verb: be together] until at least 21 or 22.

Tom: Awesome. What should I bring [common curtesy question]?

Ben: Just yourself [common curtesy answer]! But if you want to bring something, we could always use more drinks. Jerry is supplying all the finger food [light food - things easily eaten while standing and talking], but we told him we would sort out [handle] the rest.

Ben: Okay great, for sure. I'll give you a call [a more casual way to say "I'll call you"] when I'm on my way.

Jerry: Great! See you there!

 

Convincing a hesitant invitee [someone who is invited to something]


The previous dialogue is the example of a perfect invitation, but oftentimes, when inviting someone that you don't really know, or who doesn't really know many of the other guests, it's not always easy to convince them that they should come and meet new people. So here are some tips to convince even the shyest of people!


Alex: Hey Rory! What are you up to [have you got plans] Friday night?

Rory: Uhm, not sure yet, it's only Tuesday.

Alex: Haha very funny. Well, if you haven't got anything better to do [if you don't have plans], why don't you come to a little get together that I'm holding for my birthday?

Rory: Yeah, maybe, will I know anyone there?

Alex: Well, it's just going to be a few of us from the office, I think you know Max and Sara no?

Rory: Yeah, I've seen them around [I'm familiar with them]. I'll think about it and get back to you tomorrow [this is a nice way of saying, thanks but no thanks], okay?

Alex: Come on, don't be a party pooper [someone who ruins the party or mood], it'll be fun! A few colleagues, some appetizers and plenty to drink. Nothing crazy, right?

Rory: Okay, okay, you're right. What can I bring?

Alex: Don't worry about it, I've got it covered [everything is prepared].

Rory: Okay, if you're sure. Thanks for inviting me.

Alex: No problem, make sure you mark it on your calendar!

 

So there you have it, a few extra phrasal verbs and some casual language that you can use in the work place or somewhere similar to try and get people together. Smart working and all those online meetings are great for optimizing time and connecting with more people in a day, but sometimes we all need a good old fashioned face to face get together, don't you think?

 

Glossary

  • to get to know [someone or something]: to start to become familiar with

  • mingle: to socialize

  • bring it up: to mention

  • oftentimes: a fancy way to say often

  • face to face: in person


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